4 Replies to “Rahm Emanuel Kicked off Ballot, Patrick McDonough objector declares Victory”

  1. If Rahm was not being a sterotypical J^&, by renting out his house, nobody would even try to bump him, the job he had with Obama usually lasts 2 yearsso if he was getting 2 G a month thats 48,000. he made 8 million from corrupt financial institutions, he could not afford to take a bite each month ?? That is what cost him

  2. Gonna repost because I did it from my phone

    If Rahm was not being a sterotypical J^&, by renting out his house, nobody would even try to bump him, the job he had with Obama usually lasts 2 years, so if he was getting 2 G a month in rent, thats 48,000. he made 8 million from corrupt financial institutions, he could not afford to take a bite each month ?? That is what cost him

  3. January 25, 2011
    Emanuel lawyers file ballot appeal with Supreme Court
    Share | Posted by Jeff Coen at 10:12 a.m.

    Lawyers for Rahm Emanuel today filed their appeal to the Illinois Supreme Court asking to have him restored to the Chicago mayoral ballot.

    The document asking for the high court to step into the matter comes after Monday’s appellate court ruling stripping Emanuel’s name from the Feb. 22 ballot. Emanuel lawyer Kevin Forde said the document was filed in Springfield and Chicago this morning.

    It’s not certain that the high court will agree to Emanuel’s petition to hear his case — if they decline to take up the issue, Emanue’s bid for mayor would suffer a likely fatal blow.

    Emanuel’s attorneys are already waiting for an answer from the state’s highest court on their request for a stay of the appellate court ruling, which could help them stop city election authorities from going ahead with plans today to print ballots without Emanuel’s name.

    The 2-1 appellate decision said Emanuel does not meet residency requirements that he be a city resident for a year before an election.

    The document pleading for the high court to take up the case calls the appellate court decision “one of the most far-reaching election law rulings ever to be issued by an Illinois court, not only because of its implications for the current Chicago mayoral election but also for the unprecedented restriction that it imposes on the ability of numerous individuals to participate in every future municipal elections in this state.”

    The standard put in place for residency by the appellate court is so restrictive, two presidents from Illinois – Obama and Lincoln – would have found their ability to run for local office cut off by it, Emanuel’s lawyers argue in the filing with the state’s highest court.
    Emanuel’s lawyers cite six “fundamental reasons” the lower court decision should be reversed.

    The ruling is “squarely inconsistent” with prior high court decisions on residency; the restrictive view of the majority has no precedent; the ruling infringes on the rights of those in Emanuel’s situation to vote; there should only be one legal definition of “resided in” in state and municipal code; the new appellate court residency requirement creates too much uncertainty for candidates going forward; and it strips candidates of the provision that government service does not have a negative impact on residency.

    The document cites dissenting Appellate Judge Bertina Lampkin’s view that the majority failed to define its new standard for what it means for a candidate to “reside in” a place before an election.

    A businessman called away for a monthlong trip could become ineligible to run for office, as could members of Congress who go to Washington.

    Emanuel should be exempted from a residency challenge because he was in service to the country as White House chief of staff, the lawyers contend.

    “Certainly President Obama does not meet the standard adopted by the two Justices, because he does not ‘actually reside’ in Chicago,” the lawyers wrote.

    Monday’s decision was the first major setback for Emanuel, who has a wide lead over his opponents in fundraising and the Tribune’s mayoral poll.

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