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Chicago Clout exposes Journeyman's Local 130 with James Sullivan at the helm.

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A math lesson for all the furlough days, there are 2080 work hours in a year if you work 8 hours a day 40 hours a week 52 weeks out of the year, when you had holiday pay and vacation days that is how many hours you get paid for before any overtime which I understand no longer exists either so at $44 per hour a plumber makes $91520 with 24 days off that you no longer get paid for, the amount of $$$ that you are out is $8448, now for easier math purposes say a salaried boss makes $150000 a year, since they are bosses and get a salary and on call 24/7 and are required to take off the same 24 days as an hourly employee is, however because of this they do not get 8 hours of a 40 hour work week deducted from their check they get 1/365th of the $150000 deducted for each day which is approx. only $411 each day they are off without pay so $411 X 24 days off = $9864 a boss getting $150000 a year makes about $58500 a year more than a plumber yet only loose $1416 more than a plumber does, pretty nice huhyou know they hardly ever go to jobs after hours so if the Daley system were fair the amount that the would loose should be $13848

AG: City must turn over alderman job applicationsUpdated at 06:33 PM today

March 5, 2010 (CHICAGO) (WLS) -- The Illinois Attorney General's office says the Mayor's office must turn over job applications for the two vacant Alderman positions.

The city had tried to keep the information secret. Late this afternoon, the AG's public access counselor, Cara Smith, ruled that the public should have access to information about the application process.

"When this public office becomes vacant, it follows that the public has a legitimate interest in knowing who has applied for the position so that they may evaluate whether the individuals are qualified to represent a particular ward and discern why one applicant was appointed over others," wrote Smith in the ruling.


Story: Help Wanted: City of Chicago Aldermen
The City of Chicago's Law Department had denied a Freedom of Information Act request for the information earlier this week claiming it would be an invasion of privacy that could cause "irreparable harm" to the applicants. On Wednesday, when ABC 7 pressed Mayor Richard Daley about his office's attempt to keep the applications private, he told reporters he would release the names. Almost immediately, a Mayoral spokesman said Daley had misspoken.

"I have to have some confidentiality when people come in to see me and talk to me," Daley said Thursday in explaining his desire to keep the list of Aldermanic hopefuls secret. Daley suggested some applicants may lose their current jobs if their desire for public office becomes publicly known. "You have to do it in a confidential way because many are just coming to me and giving me their ideas," Daley said. "They're already employed and don't want their employer to know."

When asked why a person would petition him for public office if they have privacy or employment concerns Daley drew the following distinction: "They're not public officials now, they are seeking to be public officials."

The AG's ruling denies the city's privacy argument. Public Access Counselor Cara Smith writes, "any right to privacy of applicants for aldermanic positions, however, does not outweigh the public's legitimate interest in obtaining information regarding the process for filling vacancies in the City Council."

Mayor Daley has sole discretion in filling aldermanic vacancies. There are currently two positions open, the 1st and 29th Wards.

Twenty-ninth Ward Alderman Isaac Carothers lost his job when he plead guilty to corruption charges. First Ward Alderman Manny Flores resigned his position to head the Illinois Commerce Commission.

In February, Mayor Daley took the unusual step of posting the aldermanic vacancies on the city's website and announcing he would accept applications from the public.

In response to the ruling, the city's law department spokesperson said it will turn over the application material next week.

PAT AND MIKE YOU GUYS ARE RIGHT ON ABOUT PLUMBERS LOCAL 130 AND ALL ITS JAGOFF OFFICERS.HOW MANY DAYS OFF ARE THEY TAKING?THEY DONT HAVE A CAR PAYMENT,DONT PAY FOR GAS,HAVE A EXPENCE ACOUNT TO TAKE OTHER ASSHOLES OUT TO LUNCH.WHAT THE FUCK.GET RID OF HALF OF THEM AND TAKE AWAY THERE CARS THAT WE PAY FOR.THESE MOTHER FUCKERS HAVE BEEN ON THE GRAVY TRAIN FOR TO LONG.WE NEED NEW BLOOD TO RUN THIS UNION THE WAY IT USE TO BE.LETS THINK ABOUT ALL THE MEMBERS NOT JUST THE FEW THAT SUCK DICK FOR A LIVING.I CANNOT LEAVE MAY NAME BECAUSE I KNOW THEY WOULD COME AFTER ME.LIKE THEY DO TO THE LITTLE GUYS.

go %uck yourself

go %uck yourself

Posted by: Anonymous | March 6, 2010 6:33 PM
_______________________

Jim Sullivan checking in

OH BOY,DO YOU THINK LOCAL 130 AND ALL ITS ASSHOLES ARE HEARING FEDERAL FOOT STEPS.HAPPY ST.PATRICKS DAY.WHAT A WASTE OF THE LOCALS MONEY.

March 8, 2010

BY FRAN SPIELMAN City Hall Reporter
The City Council will move quickly to empower Chicago's inspector general to investigate alleged hiring abuses by aldermen to bolster the city's case to get out from under the Shakman decree, an influential alderman said today.

But, Rules Committee Chairman Richard Mell (33rd) said aldermen are so divided about Mayor Daley's plan to give the inspector general more sweeping investigative authority over the City Council, a seven-member subcommittee has been appointed to sort it out.

During a series of closed-door aldermanic briefings last week with Corporation Counsel Mara Georges, there was no consensus among the 48 aldermen in attendance, the chairman said.

Some aldermen dug in their heels and advocated "doing nothing." Others wanted the City Council to create its own inspector general. And a third camp favored "some type of commission that the IG would report to -- rather than to the mayor" -- possibly the city's existing Board of Ethics.

"It's democracy in action," Mell said.

Ald. Anthony Beale (9th) said he favors a commission to select and oversee the inspector general.

"We've had an IG who ran amok. We don't need another one of those," Beale said, referring to former Inspector General David Hoffman, who used the office as a platform to launch his campaign for the U.S. Senate.

Beale added, "If you have an irate resident or someone who's trying to run against you, you're constantly fending off false accusations. With a commission, you have a way of blocking a lot of erroneous complaints."

Zoning Committee Chairman Danny Solis (25th) said he, too, favors the commission approach.

"It's not pleasant to think about [the inspector general investigating aldermen], but we need it just because of all of the problems we've had with some aldermen being indicted," Solis said.

"More important, the public has just had enough. ... There's a big clamor for some sort of process that would look at whatever is perceived to be hanky-panky going on with elected officials."

Budget Committee Chairman Carrie Austin (34th) is in the "do-nothing" camp.

"Why the hell do we need an inspector general breathing down our necks? To do what? We're already cautious as hell. And we have nothing to do with hiring," Austin said.

Last month, Daley proposed that oversight over city hiring be transferred from the $4 million-a-year Office of Compliance he created in 2007 to Inspector General Joe Ferguson. He also touched a raw nerve by proposing that Ferguson be empowered to investigate aldermen.

The clock is ticking. U.S. District Judge Wayne Andersen, who has overseen the long-running Shakman case, is due to retire in August. If court oversight doesn't end by then, the case will be assigned to a new judge, and it could continue for years.

Federal monitor Noelle Brennan has been policing city hiring since the 2005 scandal that culminated in the conviction of Daley's former patronage chief on charges of rigging city hiring and promotions to benefit the Hispanic Democratic Organization (HDO) and other pro-Daley armies of political workers.

The monitor and her associates have already cost Chicago taxpayers $6.65 million -- and the meter is still running.

LETS JUST DUMP HALF THE ALDERCROOKS AND VOTE OUT THE REST. IN A PERFECT WORLD THIS WOULD HAPPEN.BUT THIS IS CHICAGO AND JACKOFF DALEY WILL WIN AGAIN,AND HIS ALDERCROOKS WILL KISS HIS ASS AND THEY TOO WILL BE RELECTED.SOOOOO SAY GOOD BYE TO THE CITY JOBS AND WELCOME IN THE 2ND COMING OF DETROIT CITY,BOARDED UP BUILDING,NO JOBS,PEOPLE HURTING ALL OVER AND THEN YOU LOOK AT DALEY AND THE ALDERCROOKS STILL AS FAT AS EVER.

PAT HAVE YOU HEARD ANYTHING ABOUT LOCAL 130 BEING LOOKED INTO FOR MONEY ISSUES? IS IT TRUE THAT THE LOCAL HAD TO TAKE OUT LOANS? IWAS TOLD ONLY 240 CONTRACTORS ARE PAYING INTO THE HALL. IS THIS TRUE? CAN YOU COMMENT ON ANY OF THIS OR IS THIS JUST A B.S STORY. THANK YOU WORRIED MEMBER.

recently i called in to try and have my dues reduced,do to some hardship,and because i had just over the max...which is 175 hours in 3 months....and was told by my union they could not help me,and was told,pay them,or be suspended. i have been a member for 15 years,and have never needed help,nor had to worry where my familys next meal will come from... worried member

Once upon a time, being a union plumber was something to be proud of. I have not got a paycheck for over 16 months and they cut off my heath insurance and all benefits. Plumbers protect the health of the nation. Now that's something to be proud of. Here is my question. Who protects the health of the plumber? Here is the answer: sorry we're not in right now were on vacation please call back, or talk to our out of work answer machine and please speak clearly. Basically fuck you, pay me. (Response) many folks think James Sullivan ran the joint down the toilet. HIs family life is a mess also.